Bluetooth Versus Clutter: It’s A No-Brainer. . .

Bluetooth devices are usually up close and personal items like headsets, mice, keyboards and printers. This assures the user of exposure to digital microwave signals at thousands of times the recommended levels. Headsets may be the riskiest, being worn not only long-term but in close proximity to the inner ear, eye, brain and salivary glands, any of which can develop tumors with suspected links to microwave radiation. Operating in the 2.4 GHz range, Bluetooth was designed to penetrate solid objects; its specifications mandate a minimum range of 10 meters, but manufacturers are free to adjust that range to meet their goals. So, hey: is the added convenience of fewer cables cluttering your desk worth the added risk?

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About ibemc

Executive Director, IBE
This entry was posted in All Topics, Chemical & Electro-sensitivity. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Bluetooth Versus Clutter: It’s A No-Brainer. . .

  1. Carol Cannon says:

    So glad the Building Biology Blog is alive! Thanks, Michael!

  2. valerie dow says:

    What kind of meter or information is used to determine RF and microwave radiation from cell phones, WiFi, and bluetooth? Is there already a conversation about this?

    • KB says:

      I have a meter called “Electrosmog Meter” which I purchased from Less EMF, Inc. for about $200 in 2009. It measures frequencies between 50 MHz and 3.5 GHz. It registers readings near cell phones, bluetooth, WiFi and microwave ovens when they are turned on. I get very high readings with it near cell phone towers too.

      If I were in the market for a meter today, I would probably look for one that goes up to even higher frequencies, as cell phone towers broadcast as high as 8 GHz, I believe. This type of meter might be more expensive than what I paid, but I do see prices coming down. And I do believe that owning meters is extremely helpful. It definitely made a believer out of me and my family.

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